Glossary

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

Abanico (Kali): fan (quick wrist snap strike)

Ala contra (Kali): counter to, against

Alisto (Kali): look, be ready, prepared

Ampo (Kali): pray, meditate

Anyo (Kali): form

Atemi Waza (Japanese): “punch and kick techniques.” Kempo techniques for defense against punches.

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B

Back Punch: The fist is palm up, parallel to the floor, with the striking surface being the first two knuckles. This punch is delivered in a straight forward motion, unlike an uppercut.

Balance: Two triangles, head and chest. If they point in different directions, balance is off.

Banda-Banda (Kali): a horizontal side to side motion

Barong (Kali): leaf shaped short sword

Basics: Simplified moves that comprise the fundamentals of Kempo. They are divided into stances, maneuvers, blocks, strikes, parries, kicks, punches, specialized moves and methods, etc.

Basko (Kali): dropping strike

Block: A defensive maneuver used to check or hinder an opponent.

Bob and Weave: Body maneuvers used to avoid an attack. A “bob” involves a vertical movement of the body. A “weave” is a horizontal side to side movement of the body.

Bodhidharma (India): (Da Mo) prince of a small tribe in South India who became a warrior priest and 28th patriarch of the Buddhist faith. Known for setting the ground work for Shaolin. Chuan-fa died in 539 A.D.

Bolo (Kali): short sword used by farmers

Borrowed Force: An opponent’s force which is used to defeat him. This can be accomplished by going with the opponent’s force or, upon occasion, going against his force. The concept allows your opponent’s force to enhance the effectiveness of your action.

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C

Check: To restrain, hinder, or repress an opponent from taking action. This is accomplished by pressing, pinning, or hugging an opponent usually at the joints so that it minimizes his leverage and nullifies his actions.

Chi (Chinese): The powers that can be generated when the mind and body are totally unified. It involves complete synchronization of mind, breath, and strength to achieve maximum force. It is that extra inner force created by the precise synchronization of the conscious and subconscious mind, along with an individual’s breath and strength.

Chi Kung (Chinese): the practice

Chin Na (Chinese): “seize and control.” Chinese ancestor of jujitsu, which uses traps, locks, and pressure point attacks as well as holds and throws.

Chojun, Miyagi: Founder of Goju-Ryu Karate. The first to introduce Kempo Karate to the U.S. In 1934 he came to the Island of Kauai, Hawaii and taught more than 100 students. Miyagi is the base for the Mr. Miyagi character of the movies.

Chow, William (AKA Thunderbolt): studied Hung Gar Kung Fu /Kosho-Ryu Kempo. One of seven Black Belts promoted by James Mitose (signed by Thomas Young).

Chuan Fa (Chinese): “Way of the Fist,” the name originally given by the Shaolin Monks to their fighting art.

Circular Movements: Moves that predominantly loop or follow a curve. Such moves can be used defensively or offensively.

Classical: Traditional methods and moves used by the so called “pure system” of Martial Arts.

Claws: Refers to the fingertips as used in a technique

Clock Principle: A system in teaching to help the student to visually imagine the direction which he is to follow. The student is generally asked to think of himself as being in the middle of a big clock facing 12 o’clock, with 6 o’clock to the rear, 3 and 9 to his right and left and all other numbers in their respective places.

Close Range Encounters: Action that occurs within elbow and knee distance.

Cob cob (Kali): Tap, tap

Common Sense: It is that sixth sense that many lack. It is the ability to overcome problems and difficult situations by using logic.

Corto Curvado (Kali): bend, have curve, half the distance to abanico

Crane Strike: The fingers and thumb are bunched together, forming a shape similar to a bird’s head. The strike is delivered with a whipping motion; the striking surface is partially the back of the wrist and partially the back of the hand as the hand whips to make impact.

Crescent: A path of action that can be compared and paralleled to a hooking type maneuver.

Cross Elbow: The arm is bent with the hand next to the shoulder, and the strike is delivered by moving the elbow in a horizontal movement, moving across the body from outside to inside. The striking surface is the upper end of the forearm and elbow. Also know as Whipping Elbow.

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D

Dan (Japanese): Black Belt levels 1-10 in Shaolin Kempo

Decadena (Kali): chain or series of strikes

Dim Mak (Chinese): literally poison hand, the art of delivering damaging waves of chi to destroy your attacker’s organs.

Dóble-Zero (Kali): two consecutive circular strikes out in front or off to the side

Dojo (Japanese): “Place of the Way.” Kempo training hall.

Downward Ridge Hand: The fingers are extended and joined, with the thumb tucked against the palm of the hand. The striking surface is the outside of the first knuckle of the index finger, just above the thumb joint. This strike is delivered as a downward-angled blow, palm down.

Downward Sword: This is an open hand strike, fingers extended and joined (close together), thumb tucked against the side of the hand. The striking surface is the blade of the hand (the pinky side). This strike is delivered in a downward motion, generally at a 45 degree angle to vertical with the palm up.

Dragon Palm: This is an open hand strike, fingers splayed. The striking surface is the heel of the palm.

Driving Sword: The fingers of the hand are extended and joined with the thumb tucked against the side of the hand. The striking surface is the blade of the hand, and the strike is delivered with a forceful, straight driving motion with the fingers pointed up.

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E

Economy of Motion: Any movement that takes less time to execute and still causes the intended effect.

Eighteen Hand Movements: The original number of hand movements first developed to defend or attack an opponent. These moves supposedly formed the foundations of Shaolin Boxing.

Elastico (Kali): body shifting technique where the feet usually stay planted

Enganyo (Kali): to fake or feint

Erishi Shou (Chinese): “Twenty Palms.” Black Belt blocking exercise.

Espada y Daga (Kali): Spanish for sword and dagger

F

Feint: A misleading move used to deceive an opponent.

Flexed Foot: Toes are pulled back towards the knee.

Floretti (Kali): small oval like a flower petal

Focus: The result of the entire body working as a unit at the very instant a target is struck. The concentration of mind (knowledge), breath, strength, and methods of execution must unite as one in conjunction with body momentum, torque, gravitational marriage, timing, speed, penetration, etc.

Form: Literally a short story of motion. These motions are offensive and defensive maneuvers incorporated into a dance for purposes of learning, home training and exercise. They are usually done without a partner.

Formulate: The combining of moves into a systematized order, which when properly organized, develops into a logical and practical sequential arrangement.

Front Position: Feet together, knees very slightly flexed. Left open palm (peace) covers right closed fist (combat). This is the attention position in Kempo.

Front Punch: The fist is palm down, parallel to the floor, with the striking surface being the first two knuckles. This punch is delivered in a straight forward motion. This punch is also called a “front two-knuckle punch.”

Full Contact: The professional method of freestyling (sparring) where actual hitting is accepted as part of the rules

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G

Garotte (Kali): escrima stick, also called kahoi, baston, or olise

Gunting (Kali): scissors

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H

Hachi Ten Do (Japanese): “Eight Point Way” Basic blocking exercise in four sections.

Hammering: A particular method of striking which resembles the action of a hammer pounding a nail from various angles.

Hammer Punch: The fist is vertical, perpendicular to the floor, with the striking surface being the side of the fist opposite the thumb. This punch is delivered in an overhead motion, much like a downward stab.

Hiken (Japanese): “hidden fist.” The Kempo fist/palm salute: knuckles of right fist meet left open palm, positioned in front of the practitioner’s chest. Also known as Hung mun ch uan (Chinese): “Secret society fist,” and Mu Te (Japanese): “empty hands.” Specifically, the kempo open hand salute.

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I

Immortal Man: This strike is classified as a poke. The first two fingers of the hand are extended and joined, slightly bent to absorb the force of impact.

Internal Power: Force from within developed via Chi

Inverted Hammer: This strike is delivered similar to a Hammer Strike, but circles downward, to the lower abdomen or groin. The striking surface is the side of the hand. This strike is also called a Reverse Hammer Strike.

Inverted Ridge Hand: The fingers are extended and joined, with the thumb tucked against the palm of the hand. The striking surface is the outside of the first knuckle of the index finger, just above the thumb joint. This strike is delivered as an outside-circling blow, palm up.

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J

Judo (Japanese): literally, “the gentle way”

Ju jit su (Japanese): “gentle art.” Techniques of throwing, joint-locking, holding, and choking as well as escape techniques employed in self-defense.

Ju Ten Do (Japanese): “Ten Point Way” Green belt blocking exercise

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K

Kalasag (Kali): shield

Kamagong (Kali): (Ironwood) hardwood baston

Karate (Japanese): “empty hand”

Kata (Japanese): “formal exercise” or “form”: a pattern of predetermined fighting movements. (Thirteen forms are required for Black Belt.)

Kempo (Japanese): “Way of the Fist.” Originally a Chinese word (Ch’uan Fa)

Ki (Japanese): see Chi

Kiai (Japanese): Originally “breathing exercise,” literally “spirit meeting.” A loud noise cause by the rapid expulsion of air from the diaphragm of the body. This expulsion of air creates stability, increases force, fortifies the body and can have a psychological effect upon your opponent.

Kong shou (Chinese): “empty hand”

Kosho-Ryu (Japanese): literally “old pine tree style”, developed in 1560 by Shaolin-inspired priest Koshu

Kris (Kali): Moro sword with wavy blade

Kung fu (Chinese): skill acquired through practice

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L

Lakang (Kali): to step

Larga Mano (Kali): long range fighting

Locks: Moves that lock the joints or body parts of your opponent to restrain him from taking further action. It combines methods of pushing and pulling.

Leopard Paw: This is a partially closed hand strike, with the fingers curled in on themselves and pulled back hard from the palm. The thumb is tucked closely against the side of the hand, and the strikes are delivered with the knuckles.

Long Range Encounters: Action that occurs at the length of an arm or leg

Luhod (Kali): kneel

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M

Meditation: A brief period of mental relaxation used in Kenpo to eliminate outside distractions from the mind in order to fully concentrate on activities that are to be learned in class. Taking the time to do this helps to avoid unnecessary injury which might otherwise occur.

Mui Fa Shou (Chinese): “Plum Flower Hands.” Black Belt blocking exercise

Muk Yan Fa (Chinese): “Wooden Man Techniques.” 108 Black Belt techniques in shaolin kempo

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N

Numerada (Kali): by the numbers

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O

Obi (Japanese): literally, belt — the 1-3/4” inch belt tied around the body in a square knot.

Ocho-Ocho (Kali): a horizontal figure 8 motion out in front.

Open End Triangle: Refers to the positioning of your body parts so that they form an open ended triangle. Use of these body formations help to funnel, wedge, trap, or prevent an opponent from injuring you.

Orthodox Fighting Stance: Left foot is placed further in front of the right foot, thus having the weaker side closer to the opponent. It is mostly used by right-handed fighters.

Otra Vez (Kali): to repeat

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P

Pakal (Kali): ice pick grip of the knife

Pankration (Greek): three thousand year old form of martial art filtered to India to become the art of Vajramuhti Yudda.

Pares (Kali): pairs

Payong (Kali): umbrella or overhead block, strike

Philtrum: the groove just above the upper lip and just below the nose, situated between the nostrils

Pinan (Chinese): literally “Peace,” “harmony.” Five of the thirteen kata required for Black Belt.

Ping Te (Chinese): Fighting principles in action. In San Chai Na Kempo, the required techniques which embody the principles of the art.

Pointed Foot: The toes are extended away from the body.

Power: The culmination of several principles, the sum total of which maximizes the expenditure of energy. It is the magnification of force aided by concentrated focus. Its capacity is proportionate to the physical strength, force, or energy exerted, in addition to the speed it is rendered.

Practical arts: The use of logical moves in a system that are realistic and not fanciful or impractical moves.

Practitioner: One who learns, teaches and practices the Martial Arts.

Principles: Comprehensive and fundamental rules stemming from theories which, through devoted analysis, develop into proven characteristics that make them doctrine.

Primitive Stage: That stage of learning where moves are crudely executed

Punyo (Kali): the butt of the baston

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R

Range: That distance which exists between you and your opponent.

Ritic (Kali): snap strike with the wrist vertical that returns on the same path, also called witic

Rolling Thunder: Also known as a rolling back fist, this strike is a closed hand strike, delivered with an overhand rolling motion. The striking surface is the back of the hand.

Rompída (Kali): a diagonal up and down motion

Roundhousing: Any weapon that makes contact with its target before reaching the apex of the circular path in which it is traveling.

Rules: Generally refer to those moves that are to be followed to the letter. Such moves can only restrict flexibility and, therefore, ideas rather than rules are stressed in Kenpo.

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S

Saagan (Kali): deflect or block

Sagawas (Kali): from the outside

SakSak (Kali): regular grip of the knife

Saludo (Kali): salute

Salutation: A series of moves and/or gestures in Kempo to indicate respect to one you are greeting or competing against at a tournament, in opening and closing a class, etc.

Sampai (Chinese): literally “second in command.” A senior student who serves Sensei as a model for technique

San Chai Na Kempo (Chinese & Japanese): “Three Powers Controlling” Kempo: Mind, Body and Spirit.

Scooping: The execution of a weapon that resembles the dipping motion of a shovel. It is a reverse hook that is delivered vertically.

Self-Correcting: Having a thorough knowledge of the principles, concepts and theories of the Martial Arts so as to have the ability to consistently make correct judgments to maximize every move.

Sensei (Japanese): literally “first to come or before you,” the word used to address your teacher.

Shaolin (Chinese): literally “young (pine tree) forest”

Shuto: Sword hand strike, also known as a “knife hand”.

Shuffle: Shifting the body forward and back to close or increase the distance between you and your opponent.

Sifu (Chinese): literally “father” or “master,” the word for skilled kung-fu teacher.

Sige (Kali): begin, start

Simu (Chinese): literally “master” or “mother,” the word for female kung-fu teacher.

Snake: This strike is classified as a poke. The fingers are extended and joined, and the fingers and hand are slightly cupped to absorb the force of the strike. The striking surface is the tips of the fingers; given this, this strike is best delivered to soft targets like the eyes and throat.

Soke (Japanese): literally “is that so;” founder of a martial arts system. The highest ranking a master can obtain in his lifetime.

Solar plexus: a complex network of nerves located in the abdomen. Always hit the solar plexus at a 45 degree angle up or down because it’s thin and a straight on strike is likely to miss it.

Southpaw Fighting Stance: The fighter’s right hand and right foot are forward. Southpaw is the normal stance for a left-handed fighter.

Spear: Refers to a finger poke as used in a technique.

Speed: Equal to the distance divided by the time (s=d/t) it takes to act or move. There are three categories of speed: perceptual, mental, and physical (body performance). However, although categorized separately in order to analyze what speed entails, these three elements function as one.

Stomping: A thrusting method using the foot to strike down toward targets located on or near the ground.

System: The unification of related concepts, ideas, principles, facts, truths, and basic elements of a particular school of Martial Arts.

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T

Take Down Maneuvers: Moves of defense or attack that cause an opponent to fall to the ground to immobilize, restrain, control, or to further attack.

Talon: Refers to a grab attack as used in a technique.

Target Areas: Vital areas on your or your opponent’s body which can cause injury or damage when struck.

Te (Okinawan): “hand.” Their Art was originally called Okinawa-te or “hand art” of Okinawa. This was later changed by the Japanese to karate meaning “empty hand.” This change greatly angered the Okinawans, who were Chinese by descent.

Technique: Pre-planned moves that can be used defensively or offensively with successful results.

Telegraphing: Body language that often works against you. These movements warn your opponent of your intended action and help to prepare him for his defense. This can also work against your opponent.

Teros (Kali): strike, hit

Thrust Punch: The fist is vertical, perpendicular to the floor, with the striking surface being the first two knuckles. This punch is delivered in a straight forward motion.

Tindug (Kali): stand

Tiger Claw: This is an open hand strike, fingers splayed and bent in a claw position. The initial striking surface is the heel of the palm, followed by the fingertips clawing the opponent in a downward motion.

Toyok (Kali): turn

Traditional: Generally refers to those practitioners of the Martial Arts who adhere to custom or the original concepts and moves of a particular system.

Trapping: Any stratagem designed to catch a natural weapon to prevent it from escaping.

Trigger Punch: The first knuckle of the hand is extended from the fist, with the thumb squeezed securely against the side of the finger to stabilize it.

Triple Warmer 17: This is a pressure point “located at the back of the jaw hinge here…”

“TW17 is an extremely effective point which is activated at 90 degree angle, and responds to both striking and pressing. When striking a dull heavy impact will produce the greatest effect.

“Striking this point will result in extreme shock being sent into the brain causing disorientation, unconsciousness and possibly death. Due to TW17’s location it is also likely that a forceful strike will dislocate the jaw.

“When pressed TW17 will cause intense localised pain and force the recipient to try to move away from the pain.”

(definition found at www.fightingarts.com)

Twin Dragon: This strike is classified as a poke. Two fingers are extended, slightly curved to absorb the force of the strike. The striking surface is the tips of the fingers; given this, this strike is best delivered to soft targets like the eyes and throat.

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U

Upward Elbow: The arm is bent with the hand next to the shoulder, and the strike is delivered by moving the elbow in an upward direction, from the hip to just above the shoulder. The striking surface is the upper end of the forearm and elbow.

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V

Vital Areas: The major weak points of the body. See Target Areas.

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W

Wing Chun (Chinese): literally “beautiful Springtime.” Developed by a Buddhist nun
named Ng Mei. Wing Chun was Bruce Lee’s base art.

Wu Shu (Mandarin Chinese): national martial art of China. Total sum of all Chinese arts.

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Z

Zen: Buddhist form of meditation perpetuated by Tamo (Daruma).

Zone Theories: This entails visualizing imaginary boundaries or zones of height, width and depth superimposed on your body or that of your opponent.

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