Kicks & Drills

Basic Kicks
Clock Kicks
Ping Shen Tao Kicking Set
Other Kicks

Basic Kicks

Front Instep: Foot snaps forward from crane stance, foot pointed. Striking surface is the instep of the foot (shoelaces).
Front Kick: Foot snaps forward from crane stance, foot flexed. Striking surface is the sole of the foot.
Side Thrust: Foot snaps to the side from crane stance, foot flexed. Pivot on the ball of the foot so the heel points at the target, then pivot back when returning to crane stance. Striking surface is the sole of the foot, with emphasis on the heel.
Back Kick: Foot snaps to the rear from crane stance, foot flexed. Look behind you as you kick, to ensure you impact the target. Striking surface is the heel of the foot.
Roundhouse Kick: While this kick is still delivered from a crane stance, it snaps from the side rather than the front, so the crane stance is rather more open than usual. Foot is pointed. Striking surface is the instep.
Hook Kick: This is the reverse of the roundhouse kick. Instead of snapping forward, the foot is extended past the target and then drawn sharply back, to impact with the back of the heel. Foot is flexed.
Crescent Kick: The knee draws up to a crane stance. The knee moves in an outside circle, snapping a kick at the top of the arc. Foot is flexed and canted inward. Striking surface is the inside surface of the foot.
Reverse Crescent Kick: The knee draws up to a crane stance. The knee moves in an inside circle, snapping a kick at the top of the arc. Foot is flexed and canted outward. Striking surface is the blade (outside edge) of the foot.
Stepping Stool Kick: Knee opposite the kicking foot is drawn up in a crane stance. Lift the knee and jump onto that foot, snapping a front kick with the foot you had been standing on. The effect is like stepping onto a stool to gain lift for a kick delivered as you jump off. Foot is flexed. Striking surface is the ball of the foot.

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Clock Kicks

Clock kicks are low to mid-height kicks, generally delivered to a target below the hip. The principle behind clock kicks is that as a kick is delivered to an opponent’s knee or thigh, there is a possibility that the practitioner’s foot could slip off target, rendering the kick less effective and possibly knocking the practitioner off balance. By turning the toes to the inside or outside of the target, the practitioner has a better chance of making solid impact without losing effectiveness or balance.

Clock kicks use a clock face to describe the angle at which the toes are pointed while delivering the kick. The toes will point at either 2 (diagonally to the right), 12 (straight up), or 10 (diagonally to the left). Whether the toes point to the inside or outside depends on which foot is being used to kick. Regardless of direction, the striking surface for these kicks is the bottom of the foot.

Clock Kicks, Right Foot
2 o’clock: Inverted Foot Stomp (toes point to the outside)
12 o’clock: Front Snap Kick (toes point up)
10 o’clock: Side Snap Thrust (toes point to the inside)

Clock Kicks, Left Foot
2 o’clock: Side Snap Thrust (toes point to the inside)
12 o’clock: Front Snap Kick (toes point up)
10 o’clock: Inverted Foot Stomp (toes point to the outside)

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Ping Shen Tao Kicking Set

Right Foot: Front Kick
Left Foot: Side Kick
Right Foot: Back Kick
Left Foot: Roundhouse Kick
Right Foot: Hook Kick
Left Foot: Crescent Kick
Right Foot: Reverse Crescent Kick
Left Foot: Stepping Stool Kick

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Drill #1
Perform all kicks from 3×3 area from left foot forward fighting stance, right foot kicking. Repeat from right foot forward fighting stance, left foot kicking.

Drill #2
Step forward after each kick. Repeat starting with left foot first.

Drill #3
Step forward after each kick and incorporate spinning footwork. Repeat starting with left foot first.

Drill #4
Laro. Play, free flow, combo kicks at all angles.

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Other Kicks

Axe Kick: This is one of the few kicks that does not finish in a crane stance. It is executed with a downward, straight-legged smash with the back of the heel as the striking surface. Because of the risk of injury, students are encouraged to arrest the downward motion of the kick an inch or two above the floor.

Bo Kick: This is another kick that does not involve a crane stance. The leg swings from the hip with the knee straight and back down to the floor. The striking surface is the shin.

Heel Kick: Any kick where the striking surface is the heel, as opposed to the ball or sole of the foot.

Snake Kick: This kick is a rare type because the striking surface is the ends of the toes. For this reason, this kick should only be used for soft targets, like the stomach or throat. Striking a hard target (ribs, legs, or face) with the toes could result in injury to the practitioner. To execute a snake kick, the practitioner comes up to a crane stance, shoots the foot out with the toes pointed, and returns to a crane stance before stepping down to a two-footed stance.

Stomp Kick: A kick directed through the attacker’s body at a downward angle. A side stomp is delivered like a side kick, with the standing foot pivoting so the heel points towards the opponent.

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