Hands & Elbows


How To Make a Good Fist
Grocery Store Set
Elbow Set
Other Strikes and Seizes
Inverted Strikes and Pokes
Lead Hand Strikes with Boxing Footwork
Palm Strikes
Chain Punches
Finger Strike Work
Dragon Plays with Water
1″ & 3″ Strikes
Iron Palm
Thumb Strikes

How To Make a Good Fist

Curl the fingers of the hand in towards the palm. Close the thumb over the middle knuckles – NEVER NEVER NEVER CLOSE THE THUMB INSIDE THE FINGERS. Your fist should be firm and the wrist straight.

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Grocery Store Set

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  1. Front Punch: The fist is palm down, parallel to the floor, with the striking surface being the first two knuckles. This punch is delivered in a straight forward motion. This punch is also called a “front two-knuckle punch.”
  2. Thrust Punch: The fist is vertical, perpendicular to the floor, with the striking surface being the first two knuckles. This punch is delivered in a straight forward motion.
  3. Back Punch: The fist is palm up, parallel to the floor, with the striking surface being the first two knuckles. This punch is delivered in a straight forward motion, unlike an uppercut. This punch is also called a “back two-knuckle punch.”
  4. Hammer Punch: The fist is vertical, perpendicular to the floor, with the striking surface being the side of the fist opposite the thumb. This punch is delivered in an overhead motion, much like a downward stab.
  5. Downward Sword: This sword hand strike is delivered in a downward motion, generally at a 45° angle to vertical. A sword hand is also referred to as a knife hand or a shuto.
  6. Dragon Palm: This is an open hand strike, fingers splayed. Thumb and fourth finger should make a line parallel to the ground. The striking surface is the heel of the palm.
  7. Tiger Claw: This is an open hand strike, fingers splayed and bent in a claw position. The initial striking surface is the heel of the palm, followed by the fingertips clawing the opponent in a downward motion.
  8. Leopard Paw: This is a partially closed hand strike, with the fingers curled in on themselves and pulled back hard from the palm. The thumb is tucked closely against the side of the hand, and the strike is delivered with the knuckles. Leopard's Paw
  9. Rolling Thunder: Also known as a rolling back fist, this strike is a closed hand strike, delivered with an overhand rolling motion. The striking surface is the back of the hand.
  10. Snake: This strike is classified as a poke. The fingers are extended and joined, and the fingers and hand are slightly cupped to absorb the force of the strike. The thumb is tucked against the side of the hand to keep it out of the way and reduce the risk of injury. The striking surface is the tips of the fingers; given this, this strike is best delivered to soft targets like the eyes and throat.
  11. Upward Elbow: The arm is bent with the hand next to the shoulder, and the strike is delivered by moving the elbow in an upward direction, from the hip to just above the shoulder. The striking surface is the upper end of the forearm and elbow.
  12. Cross/Whipping Elbow: The arm is bent with the hand next to the shoulder, and the strike is delivered by moving the elbow in a horizontal movement, moving across the body from outside to inside. The striking surface is the upper end of the forearm and elbow.
  13. Twin Dragon: This strike is classified as a poke. Two fingers are extended, slightly curved to absorb the force of the strike. The striking surface is the tips of the fingers; given this, this strike is best delivered to soft targets like the eyes and throat. twindragonscomposite
  14. Crane’s Head Strike: The fingers and thumb are bunched together, forming a shape similar to a bird’s head. The strike is delivered with a whipping motion; the striking surface is partially the back of the wrist and partially the back of the hand as the hand whips to make impact.

    (A Crane’s Beak Strike has the hand in the same position, but the strike is delivered using a pecking motion and the striking surface is the tips of the bunched fingers.)
    cranecomposite

  15. Trigger Punch: The first knuckle of the hand is extended from the fist, with the thumb squeezed securely against the side of the finger to stabilize it. triggerpunchcomposite
  16. Immortal Man: This strike is classified as a poke. The first two fingers of the hand are extended and joined, slightly bent to absorb the force of impact. immortalmancompositer
  17. Driving Sword: The fingers of the hand are extended and joined with the thumb tucked against the side of the hand. The striking surface is the blade of the hand, and the strike is delivered with a forceful, straight driving motion with the fingers pointed up.
  18. Inverted Hammer: This strike is delivered similar to a Hammer Strike, but circles downward, to the lower abdomen or groin. The striking surface is the side of the hand. This strike is also called a Reverse Hammer Strike.
  19. Inverted Ridge Hand: The fingers are extended and joined, with the thumb tucked against the palm of the hand. The striking surface is the outside of the first knuckle of the index finger, just above the thumb joint. This strike is delivered as an outside-circling blow, palm up.
  20. Downward Ridge Hand: The fingers are extended and joined, with the thumb tucked against the palm of the hand. The striking surface is the outside of the first knuckle of the index finger, just above the thumb joint. This strike is delivered as a downward-angled blow, palm down.

    Ridge hand strikes can be delivered from many angles: rising, flat, downward. Regardless of the angle of attack, the hand is always shaped the same, with fingers extended and joined and the thumb tucked against the palm of the hand, and the striking surface is always the side of the first knuckle of the thumb joint.

  21. ridgehand

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Elbow Set

Upward Elbow: The arm is bent with the hand next to the shoulder, and the strike is delivered by moving the elbow in an upward direction, from the hip to just above the shoulder. The striking surface is the upper end of the forearm and elbow.
Whipping Elbow: The arm is bent with the hand next to the shoulder, and the strike is delivered by moving the elbow in a horizontal movement, moving across the body from outside to inside. The striking surface is the upper end of the forearm and elbow.
Reverse Elbow: This is the reverse movement of the whipping elbow. The striking surface is the back of the elbow and bottom of the upper arm.
Downward Elbow: This is the reverse of the upward elbow, with the strike delivered by moving the elbow sharply downward. The striking surface is the back of the elbow and bottom of the upper arm.
Additional Elbow Strikes:
Inward Driving Elbow, Outward Reverse Elbow, Twisting Reverse Elbow , Twisting Downward Elbow

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Other Strikes and Seizes

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Backfist: Similar to a rolling backfist, where the striking surface is the back of the hand, a regular backfist is delivered parallel to the floor with a backhand motion. This strike can also be delivered at the end of a turn, making it a spinning backfist.

Dragon’s Foot: The practitioner’s hand is palm down, angled outward from the wrist, thumb and fingers shaped similarly to a tiger’s mouth. The motion for a dragon’s foot is a flat curve moving outward from the opposite shoulder to the near shoulder, then straight back, seizing the attacker’s limb, often executed as part of a block.

Eagle Talon: This technique is for seizing and ripping, and is generally delivered to the opponent’s throat. The strike is formed by folding the third and fourth fingers into the palm and extending and curving the thumb, first, and second fingers like claws.
eagletaloncomposite

Poison Thumb: This technique is delivered to soft tissue, like the eyes or throat. The hand is formed into a fist, with the thumb along the side and the tip of the thumb extended past the curled fingers to support the thumb.
poison thumb

Sword Hand: Hand is flat, fingers extended and joined, thumb tucked next to the palm to keep it out of the way and avoid injury. Striking surface is the blade of the hand — the edge of the hand between the pinkie and wrist. Sword hand strikes can be delivered at a downward (45°) angle, as a cross strike (a backhand motion), a whipping strike (leads with the shoulder and whips through the elbow, culminating in a whiplash strike with the hand), or a driving strike (pushes straight through the target).

Tiger’s Mouth: This technique is a combination of a strike and a grab. The hand position looks as though the practitioner is holding a very large cylindrical object. The primary striking surface is the side of the first knuckle of the index finger. As the hand impacts the attacker, it closes around the part being struck in a pincer grip. Generally, this strike is delivered to the attacker’s throat.
tigersmouthcomposite

Tiger Palm: This strike is a grasping motion as well as a strike. The fingers are crooked, as with a tiger’s rake, but the palm is cupped. It is a particularly effective strike against the opponent’s ear, as the cupped palm creates a very painful concussion. This strike is also known as a bear paw strike.

U-punch: Simultaneous high front punch and low back punch, delivered from a forward leaning stance.
u-punch2 u-punch1

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Inverted Strikes and Pokes

Spear Poke: The hand shape for this strike is the same as for the snake strike. However, the palm faces up in the spear poke. The fingers are extended and joined, slightly flexed to help absorb the force of impact, and the thumb is tucked closely to the side of the hand to avoid injury.

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Palm Strikes

Palm Heel Strike: This open hand strike uses the heel (base) of the palm as a striking surface. Fingers should be extended and joined and the thumb tucked as closely as possible to the side of the palm to keep them out of the way and minimize the risk of injury. Palm heel strikes can be vertical (fingers pointing up), horizontal (fingers pointing sideways), or inverted (fingers pointing down).

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